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Find WHAT LINNAEUS SAW at local independent book stores or online.

WHAT LINNAEUS SAW:

A SCIENTIST’S QUEST TO NAME EVERY LIVING THING

A trailblazing scientist and intellectual rule breaker, Carl Linnaeus forever changed the way we think about the natural world.

Charles Darwin considered him one of his “two gods.” Benjamin Franklin labeled him “the great Naturalist.” The Queen of Sweden gossiped that he was “a very witty man, even if he doesn’t look it.” The Pope banned his books. Thomas Jefferson not only read them but bought copies for friends.

Now in a lively new biography, Karen Beil captures the colorful life and innovative science of the great eighteenth-century naturalist. The naturalists of the 1700s who traveled the globe searching for rare plants and animals were the “science nerds” of their day. Foremost among them was Carl Linnaeus, a teacher and radical thinker who revolutionized biology.

From his explorations into the wilds of Sweden as a boy to his time as a young medical doctor in Holland, moving among the leading scientific thinkers of the era, Karen Beil traces Linnaeus’s path to understanding and organizing the natural world. His unprecedented system for classifying and naming plants and animals, developed over the course of his life, became the foundation of modern taxonomy and inspired generations of scientists.

Rich biographical anecdotes, mystery animals, and problematic plants build suspense as Beil helps today’s readers to see WHAT LINNAEUS SAW.

REVIEW

a highly engaging and entertaining page-turning presentation further enlivened with numerous period illustrations that perfectly accompany comprehensively researched text. Excellent backmatter rounds out this fine effort.
”An outstanding biography of a brilliant and fascinating man who is well worth the attention.
— Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

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Find FIRE IN THEIR EYES at local independent book stores or online.

Rookie smokejumpers at training camp, Missoula, MT. Photo by Karen M. Beil

Rookie smokejumpers at training camp, Missoula, MT. Photo by Karen M. Beil

Smokejumper Keith Woods after a refresher jump, Missoula, MT Smokejumper base. Photo by Karen M. Beil

Smokejumper Keith Woods after a refresher jump, Missoula, MT Smokejumper base. Photo by Karen M. Beil

FIRE IN THEIR EYES:

WILDFIRES AND THE PEOPLE WHO FIGHT THEM

Why would anyone stand in the way of a wildfire? Despite the danger, a courageous few do combat wildfires, battling wilderness blazes across the country.

Sometimes these firefighters even use fire as a tool for preservation of fire-dependent habitats. In their hands, one of nature’s most destructive and unpredictable forces becomes the means to protect people, animals, and the wild lands that are America’s greatest resource. 

In researching this book, Karen Beil joined prescribed burn crews during two seasons, documented a Montana smokejumper training camp, reported on blazes fought by hotshot and Type 2 crews, and interviewed dozens of people to create a closeup portrait of ordinary heroes. A dramatic environmental adventure about science, nature, and human daredevils!

REVIEWS

Vivid photos . . . compelling account.
— Horn Book
You can almost feel the heat.
— National Geographic World
Beil profiles a handful of men and women, capturing the drama, excitement, and danger of their job. Beil’s own photographs reflect the roller coaster pace of the work—from a burly man sitting at a sewing machine repairing his parachute, to a tree exploding in a column of fire.
— Booklist
Plenty of crisp color photos of firefighters taking on exploding trees, wind-driven flames, and ‘fire whirls’ are a sure draw for browsers, and the glossary of terms will be useful to readers taking a studious approach to the topic.
— Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
This stirring on-the-scenes account of the lives of firefighters who courageously battle wildfires is guaranteed to spark the imagination of any would-be firefighter. Action photos and personal narratives make this book stay on readers’ minds long past the final page.
— Voice of Youth Advocates
Read this before you jump.
— Wildland Firefighter (a professional journal)

HONORS

American Library Association Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers
NCSS-CBC Notable Children’s Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies
Orbis Pictus Award Recommended Title - National Council of Teachers of English
Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) Nonfiction Honor List
YA Top 40 - Pennsylvania School Librarians Association
Maine Student Book Award - chosen by kids!


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Find JACK’S HOUSE at local independent book stores or at these online book sellers.

JACK’S HOUSE

Illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka

Did Jack really build the ‘house that Jack built?’ 

One hard-working, big-truck-driving, hammer-pounding pooch, Max, wants you to know his side of the story in this exciting tell-all construction tale. 

REVIEWS

[In] Beil’s twist on the classic cumulative tale of the house that Jack built . . . Max introduces readers to bulldozers and backhoes and forklifts, and a handful of trucks: cement, rack, boom and dump.
— Kirkus Reviews
A wonderful twist on an age-old rhyme. . . . The vehicles that drive up to the site delivering materials and excavating are rugged and tough, appealing to the construction enthusiasts, but the soaring house is the centerpiece of the story, and Max’s care in building it is obvious. This beguiling book will be a hit . . .
— School Library Journal

HONORS

The Original Art Exhibition, Museum of American Illustration, New York, NY

A Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Book


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Find MOOOVE OVER! at your local library.

MOOOVE OVER!

A BOOK ABOUT COUNTING BY TWOS

Illustrated by Paul Meisel

Passengers climb on to the Countingtown Trolley in an orderly way: two by two. When an obnoxious cow elbows her way on board, the driver’s careful count goes awry. Will the driver’s sharp math skills resolve this chaos?

REVIEWS

Readers will cheer as the ill-mannered bovine gets her comeuppance, and Meisel’s energetic and humorous acrylic illustrations will keep them in stitches as they practice counting by twos.
— School Library Journal
Meisel’s colorful illustrations fit this tale perfectly, with the sweet facial expressions of the cow lending surprise to her rude behavior. Not only will readers learn to count by twos, they will also learn the words used to describe pairs: duet, couple, twosome, partners . . . in this funny story.
— Kirkus Reviews

HONOR

Alabama’s Emphasis on Reading Award - chosen by kids!


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Find A CAKE ALL FOR ME! at your local library.

A CAKE ALL FOR ME!

Illustrated by Paul Meisel

Piggy is starving. So he bakes a cake. He sifts the flour, he cracks the eggs, he mixes the batter. Then knock, knock, knock! What will he do when his hungry friends unexpectedly show up at his kitchen door? Tough decision! Will he share or will he be . . . a pig?

Charming . . . A tasty treat.
— School Library Journal
Hilarious and fun.
— Midwest Book Review
an exultant pig flourishing a cake suggests some of the high spirits and simple pleasures of this rhyming book, as fluffy and sweet as seven-minute frosting. . . . The appended recipe will guide kids through making a chocolate-chip cake, to hog or to share. Good thing, because this book will put readers in the mood for a snack.
— Publishers Weekly

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Find GRANDMA ACCORDING TO ME at your local library.

grandma according to me

Illustrated by Ted Rand

A loving tribute to the special bond between grandparents and grandchildren, told from the child’s point-of-view.

REVIEWS

A preschooler offers an affectionate depiction of her traditional cookie-baking, sweater-knitting, soft-lapped grandmother. The child-like text contains several striking images: the girl happily calls her own wrinkly bathtub hands ‘grandma hands’ and the creases in her grandma’s face ‘story lines.’ . . . [Rand’s] paintings reinforce the warm-hearted mood.
— School Library Journal
Lovingly told from the child’s point of view. A first book for Beil, this winning combination of text and art will bring a smile to the reader’s face. This story is just right for families looking for books to read together and for family story times in libraries.
— Booklist
Rand’s homey illustrations depict the traditional grandmother the young narrator lovingly describes in this warm story detailing activities the two do together.
— The Horn Book